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Jason Davidson - CB Radio Specialist

Jason Davidson

Over 18 years of hands-on experience with CB radios and installations.

Frequency Counter / Frequency Display
What it does Displays the current frequency
Where to set it N/A Frequency counters show you where you are at. Changes with your channel.

Why does my radio have a Frequency Counter?

Here's something you should start with: Channels do not exist. TV channels, radio channels, memory channels, even CB channels. A channel is nothing more than a simplified way to refer to a frequency. Your radio has a Frequency Counter on it to show you where you are actually operating, however, unless you have a radio with single sideband (USB/LSB) modes, and/or is anything other than a CB, then you do not need the Frequency Counter. Let me reiterate that. Most people do NOT need to see what frequency they are operating on, any more than you need to know what frequency your TV's channel 8 is. However, there are reasons you should care about your radio's frequency. Keep reading to see why.

Make sure your radio is operating correctly

Let's say your CB is on channel 19, but everyone sounds distorted or muffled, almost like they're on a different channel altogether. How would you know if it's your radio, or theirs? Well if everyone sounds this way, then it's probably that your radio is off frequency. Your radio may have a built-in Frequency Counter, or if your radio has a frequency counter jack on the back you can use the FC-347 Frequency Counter, with either of these options you now have a tool to tell if something is amiss on your end. As long as your Frequency Counter says 27.185 and your channel says 19, then there's a good chance you're on the correct frequency. Now other problems can arise that cause these numbers to show one thing, and be something else, but for now if we assume your Frequency Counter is working correctly, then it's much easier to know that your frequency and channel are in alignment, where they should be.

Frequencies and channels.

Remember, we're dealing with radio waves, and what determines a radio station from a CB transmission from airplane pilots talking to the tower is the frequency they are operating on. Throughout the radio spectrum there are a wide range of frequencies allocated for very specific uses and applications, like TV and the aforementioned airplane pilots. You aren't allowed to transmit on just any frequency as there are rules in place to prevent the chaos that would cause. When talking about CB radios, the FCC has provided 40 channels (frequencies) that you have access to. You don't need a license (since around 1980) to operate a CB radio either, it's one of the few places the public is allowed to send and receive (almost) whatever they want.

For Single Sideband Operation

The most common use of a Frequency Counter on CB radios is when you are operating on either USB or LSB modes. When you're on single sideband, you may need to fine tune the frequency your radio is receiving, or transmitting on. You may need to adjust your frequency to make other people clear, as their radio may be slighty off frequency, turning your clarifier control will not only change the frequency you're on, but your frequency display will change as well. Again, this is used for fine-tuning only. If your radio is off frequency, adjust your clarifier until it's correct again. Refer to the following frequency chart for which frequency you should be on.

1 26.965 21 27.215
2 26.975 22 27.225
3 26.985 23 27.255
4 27.005 24 27.235
5 27.015 25 27.245
6 27.025 26 27.265
7 27.035 27 27.275
8 27.055 28 27.285
9 27.065 29 27.295
10 27.075 30 27.305
11 27.085 31 27.315
12 27.105 32 27.325
13 27.115 33 27.335
14 27.125 34 27.345
15 27.135 35 27.355
16 27.155 36 27.365
17 27.165 37 27.375
18 27.175 38 27.385
19 27.185 39 27.395
20 27.205 40 27.405

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